Management - Leadership

Author: 
Bertini, Marco
Abstract: 

The article discusses the relationship between the expansion of a business and its efforts to retain the loyalty of its core consumers, through offering a case study of a fictionalized running race company.

Publisher: 
Harvard Business School Press
Source: 
Harvard Business Review, Vol. 95, No. 5, September-October 2017, pp. 143-147
Record type: 
Date published: 
2017
Author: 
Chamorro-Premuzic, Tomas
Abstract: 

Psychologists Joyce and Robert Hogan developed a list of 11 qualities that, if unrestrained, can resemble common personality disorders. These 'dark side' qualities are grouped into three categories, distancing, seductive, and ingratiating, and include excitability, skepticism, cautiousness, boldness, and diligence.

Publisher: 
Harvard Business School Press
Source: 
Harvard Business Review, Vol. 95, No. 5, September-October 2017, pp. 138-140
Record type: 
Date published: 
2017
Author: 
Martin, Roger L.
Abstract: 

The rise of big data has bolstered the presumption that business decisions should be made using scientific analysis. However, this approach can reduce strategic options and impede innovation.

Publisher: 
Harvard Business School Press
Source: 
Harvard Business Review, Vol. 95, No. 5, September-October 2017, pp. 128-135
Record type: 
Date published: 
2017
Author: 
Sadun, Raffaella
Abstract: 

Conventional wisdom among corporate strategists is that better management processes are not a basis for competitive advantage. There are three key problems with this line of thought. First, little evidence exists that effective processes can be copied successfully. Second, variations in process quality will persist over time.

Publisher: 
Harvard Business School Press
Source: 
Harvard Business Review, Vol. 95, No. 5, September-October 2017, pp. 120-127
Record type: 
Date published: 
2017
Author: 
Ditkoff, Susan Wolf
Abstract: 

The authors examined 15 breakthrough philanthropic initiatives and found five shared elements that provide a framework for success. First, build a common understanding of the issue and its circumstances. Second, establish achievable milestones and create a compelling message. Third, develop approaches that will function on a wide scale.

Publisher: 
Harvard Business School Press
Source: 
Harvard Business Review, Vol. 95, No. 5, September-October 2017, pp. 110-118
Record type: 
Date published: 
2017
Author: 
Gopalan, Radhakrishnan
Publisher: 
Harvard Business School Press
Source: 
Harvard Business Review, Vol. 95, No. 5, September-October 2017, pp. 102-107
Record type: 
Date published: 
2017
Author: 
Rodriguez Vila, Omar
Abstract: 

There is a growing expectation among consumers for brands to have a position on social issues, and as a result many companies are taking visible stands. These positions can be beneficial to society and the brand, but require a strategy for them to be successful and not harm the brand.

Publisher: 
Harvard Business School Press
Source: 
Harvard Business Review, Vol. 95, No. 5, September-October 2017, pp. 94-101
Record type: 
Date published: 
2017
Author: 
Iansiti, Marco
Abstract: 

The article examines the dominance of hub firms - digital superpowers that are capturing a growing and disproportionate share of the global economy's value. This dominance has the potential to deepen income inequality and destabilize society.

Publisher: 
Harvard Business School Press
Source: 
Harvard Business Review, Vol. 95, No. 5, September-October 2017, pp. 84-92
Record type: 
Date published: 
2017
Author: 
Kohavi, Ron
Abstract: 

The authors posit that too many firms rely on subjective opinions when making key decisions, from marketing campaigns to new product features, and therefore place large investments at risk. They emphasize the importance of using A-B testing to shift decision making to hard data.

Publisher: 
Harvard Business School Press
Source: 
Harvard Business Review, Vol. 95, No. 5, September-October 2017, pp. 74-81
Record type: 
Date published: 
2017
Author: 
McKee, Annie
Abstract: 

Several 'traps' can compromise an individual's job satisfaction. The ambition trap drives a single-minded concentration on winning. The 'should' trap is a mindset in which a person does what is expected rather than what he or she wants to do. The overwork trap leads to stress.

Publisher: 
Harvard Business School Press
Source: 
Harvard Business Review, Vol. 95, No. 5, September-October 2017, pp. 66-73
Record type: 
Date published: 
2017