Management - Leadership

Author: 
Beard, Alison
Abstract: 

The article presents a theoretical study of a television show runner who is overseeing three programs but is having issues with time management and delegation. It mentions the producer's relationship with the network executive, her work with her staff, and her need to avoid job burn-out.

Publisher: 
Harvard Business School Press
Source: 
Harvard Business Review, Vol. 95, No. 6, November-December 2017, pp. 157-162
Record type: 
Date published: 
2017
Author: 
Bussgang, Jeffrey
Abstract: 

While startups can provide managers with professional and person rewards, it is crucial to assess one's fit before venturing to join one. Three critical factors are the ability to manage ambiguity and uncertainty, push limits, and adopt an owner's mindset. Next is selecting the right organization.

Publisher: 
Harvard Business School Press
Source: 
Harvard Business Review, Vol. 95, No. 6, November-December 2017, pp. 150-154
Record type: 
Date published: 
2017
Author: 
Williams, Maxine
Abstract: 

Organizations need to understand and acknowledge that it is reasonable for minority or marginalized employees to be wary about bias in hiring and promoting scenarios. Firms should discover ways to provide those employees with greater support.

Publisher: 
Harvard Business School Press
Source: 
Harvard Business Review, Vol. 95, No. 6, November-December 2017, pp. 142-147
Record type: 
Date published: 
2017
Author: 
Sahni, Nikhil R.
Abstract: 

Although the U.S. government and the health care industry have spent billions of dollars on information technology, productivity growth lags behind other industries, and there has been only modest improvement in clinical care quality.

Publisher: 
Harvard Business School Press
Source: 
Harvard Business Review, Vol. 95, No. 6, November-December 2017, pp. 128-138
Record type: 
Date published: 
2017
Author: 
Leonardi, Paul
Abstract: 

Internal social tools have been found to improve decision making, innovation, collaboration, and employee engagement. Four traps, however, can hinder these results: flawed assumptions regarding Millennials, repression of informal communication, failure to identify learning, and concentrating on the wrong data.

Publisher: 
Harvard Business School Press
Source: 
Harvard Business Review, Vol. 95, No. 6, November-December 2017, pp. 118-127
Record type: 
Date published: 
2017
Author: 
Vermeulen, Freek
Abstract: 

Firms often adhere too long to strategies that were once successful but have begun to fail. Several biases have been identified that can explain why leaders hold firm to these commitments, including loss aversion, personal identification, sunk cost fallacy, and preference for completion.

Publisher: 
Harvard Business School Press
Source: 
Harvard Business Review, Vol. 95, No. 6, November-December 2017, pp. 110-118
Record type: 
Date published: 
2017
Author: 
Hill, Linda A.
Abstract: 

Boards of directors face four key challenges in governing innovation: lack of expertise, insufficient time, a no-longer-relevant risk agenda, and an interrelationship with management that requires some retooling.

Publisher: 
Harvard Business School Press
Source: 
Harvard Business Review, Vol. 95, No. 6, November-December 2017, pp. 102-110
Record type: 
Date published: 
2017
Author: 
Blank, Steve
Abstract: 

The article examines the shift in power between startup founders and venture capitalists.

Publisher: 
Harvard Business School Press
Source: 
Harvard Business Review, Vol. 95, No. 6, November-December 2017, pp. 94-102
Record type: 
Date published: 
2017
Author: 
Fernandez-Araoz, Claudio
Abstract: 

The success of corporate leadership development programs depends on four steps. First, identify key competencies for leadership roles in the organization. Second, evaluate potential by assessing five success predictors: curiosity, motivation, insight, determination, and engagement.

Publisher: 
Harvard Business School Press
Source: 
Harvard Business Review, Vol. 95, No. 6, November-December 2017, pp. 86-94
Record type: 
Date published: 
2017
Author: 
Anand, N.
Abstract: 

Corporate transformations continue to prove challenging. Failure is typically attributed to problems with execution, but leaders can often misidentify what types of changes need to be made.

Publisher: 
Harvard Business School Press
Source: 
Harvard Business Review, Vol. 95, No. 6, November-December 2017, pp. 78-86
Record type: 
Date published: 
2017