Management - Leadership

Author: 
Nayak, Sunanda
Abstract: 

In this fictional case, the leadership team at one of the largest multi-specialty hospitals in Noida, India, has established a new liaison position called the patient care executive.

Publisher: 
Harvard Business School Press
Source: 
Harvard Business Review, Vol. 96, No. 1, January-February 2018, pp. 147-151
Record type: 
Date published: 
2018
Author: 
Finkelstein, Sydney
Abstract: 

What sets exceptional business leaders apart? One thing, says Sydney Finkelstein, is their ongoing commitment to giving direct reports one-on-one instruction. Finkelstein, a management professor at Dartmouth's Tuck School of Business, has studied world-class leaders for more than a decade.

Publisher: 
Harvard Business School Press
Source: 
Harvard Business Review, Vol. 96, No. 1, January-February 2018, pp. 142-145
Record type: 
Date published: 
2018
Author: 
Burton, Shawn
Abstract: 

What do you call a dense, overly lengthy contract that's loaded with legal jargon and virtually impossible for a non-lawyer to understand? The status quo, says Shawn Burton, the general counsel for GE Aviation's Business & General Aviation.

Publisher: 
Harvard Business School Press
Source: 
Harvard Business Review, Vol. 96, No. 1, January-February 2018, pp. 134-139
Record type: 
Date published: 
2018
Author: 
Kaplan, Robert S
Abstract: 

More than a billion people in the developing world remain in extreme poverty and outside the formal economy. Traditional CSR programs have done little to alleviate the situation and rarely produce transformative change.

Publisher: 
Harvard Business School Press
Source: 
Harvard Business Review, Vol. 96, No. 1, January-February 2018, pp. 126
Record type: 
Date published: 
2018
Author: 
Campbell, Dennis
Abstract: 

Fifty years ago a good blue-collar job was with a large manufacturer such as General Motors or Goodyear. Often unionized, it paid well, offered benefits, and was secure. But manufacturing employment has steadily declined, from about 25% of the U.S. labor force in 1970 to less than 10% today.

Publisher: 
Harvard Business School Press
Source: 
Harvard Business Review, Vol. 96, No. 1, January-February 2018, pp. 118
Record type: 
Date published: 
2018
Author: 
Davenport, Thomas H
Abstract: 

Cognitive technologies are increasingly being used to solve business problems; indeed, many executives believe that AI will substantially transform their companies within three years. But many of the most ambitious AI projects encounter setbacks or fail.

Publisher: 
Harvard Business School Press
Source: 
Harvard Business Review, Vol. 96, No. 1, January-February 2018, pp. 108
Record type: 
Date published: 
2018
Author: 
Downes, Larry
Abstract: 

Accelerating technological improvements have changed the speed with which new innovations penetrate markets. Graphed over time, the market adoption of innovations now resembles a dramatic shark fin--a dangerously deformed version of the classic bell-curve model of diffusion.

Publisher: 
Harvard Business School Press
Source: 
Harvard Business Review, Vol. 96, No. 1, January-February 2018, pp. 98
Record type: 
Subject: 
Date published: 
2018
Author: 
McCord, Patty
Abstract: 

Most companies approach hiring with faulty assumptions and poor practices. They believe talent is fixed rather than contextual. They fail to create real partnerships between internal recruiters and hiring managers. And they rely too much on salary surveys and rigid compensation formulas.

Publisher: 
Harvard Business School Press
Source: 
Harvard Business Review, Vol. 96, No. 1, January-February 2018, pp. 90-97
Record type: 
Subject: 
Date published: 
2018
Author: 
Chatterji, Aaron K
Abstract: 

Though corporations have been lobbying the government and making campaign donations for a long time now, in recent years a dramatic new trend has emerged in U.S. politics: CEOs are taking very public stands on thorny political issues that have nothing to do with their firms' bottom lines.

Publisher: 
Harvard Business School Press
Source: 
Harvard Business Review, Vol. 96, No. 1, January-February 2018, pp. 78
Record type: 
Date published: 
2018
Author: 
Hamori, Monika
Abstract: 

Companies say they want their employees to learn and grow, but in practice, they skimp on training. In a recent study of 1,481 employed learners, more than one-third of them said they had received no training from their companies in the previous 12 months.

Publisher: 
Harvard Business School Press
Source: 
Harvard Business Review, Vol. 96, No. 1, January-February 2018, pp. 70-76
Record type: 
Date published: 
2018