Liberia and the Universal, Negro improvement association: The background to the bortion of Garvey's scheme for African colonization

Author: 
Akpan, M.B.
Publisher: 
Cambridge University Press
Date published: 
1973
Record type: 
Journal Title: 
Journal of African History
Source: 
Journal of African History, Vol.14,No.1,1973,pp105-127
Abstract: 

In July 1924, the Liberian government suddenly banned the Universal Negro Improvement Association from Liberia, and this after over four years of apparent co-operation with the Association in its plans to settle New World Negroes in Liberia and generally to aid Liberia financially. Yet the ban could not have surprised anyone familiar with Liberian matters. The Liberian economy, which at the advent of the Association in 1920 was in a very bad state, was beginning to recover independently of the Association. Moreover, Britain and France, which had colonies nearby, abhorred the Association's anti-colonialism crusade, and Liberia feared to alienate these powers. But most importantly, the ruling Americo-Liberian class feared that the Association's immigrants might challenge its already entrenched, privileged position in Liberia, and probably end its exploitation and oppression of Liberia's indigenous African population, which provided labour and revenue for this class and for the Liberian government generally.

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CITATION: Akpan, M.B.. Liberia and the Universal, Negro improvement association: The background to the bortion of Garvey's scheme for African colonization . : Cambridge University Press , 1973. Journal of African History, Vol.14,No.1,1973,pp105-127 - Available at: http://library.africa-union.org/liberia-and-universal-negro-improvement-association-background-bortion-garveys-scheme-african-2

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