Guerrilla Broadcasters and the Unnerved Colonial State in Angola (1961–74)

Guerrilla Broadcasters and the Unnerved Colonial State in Angola (1961–74)

Author: 
Moorman, Marissa J.
Publisher: 
Cambridge University Press
Date published: 
2018
Record type: 
Journal Title: 
The Journal of African History
Source: 
The Journal of African History, Vol. 59, N0. 2, 2018 pp. 241-261
Abstract: 

Catholic school alumni played a crucial role in shaping Senegal and Benin in the first decades after independence.1 Though they came from a variety of religious and socioeconomic backgrounds, they nevertheless strongly identified with their Catholic schooling experience. Indeed, these West African alumni composed a distinct social group that had been inculcated in the habits and values of 'Catholic civism', an ideology based around public service, self-discipline, moral restraint, honesty, and community. While many studies of educated youth emphasize their political activism, Catholic school youth engaged in the subtler process of shaping their new countries by transforming colonial-era institutions from within. Beyond politics, students who graduated in the early independence era used Catholic civism as both a social marker and an implicit social critique.

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Date created: 
Tuesday, March 5, 2019